How far are you expected to run before training?

tajnz

New Member
#1
Most rowing clubs expect their members to complete quite lengthy runs as warm ups. So how for how long and far are you expected to run and do you enjoy it? Also are you required to run as a team of just as individuals?
 
#2
I am no longer a member of a rowing club, unfortunately. We moved and there are no rowing clubs near me. We did a thorough warm up at my old rowing club, it wasn't always running, we also used cycling and other exercises to warm up.
 

tajnz

New Member
#3
I am no longer a member of a rowing club, unfortunately. We moved and there are no rowing clubs near me. We did a thorough warm up at my old rowing club, it wasn't always running, we also used cycling and other exercises to warm up.
Thanks for replying Shaun! :D It's a shame there aren't any rowing clubs in your area. I'm lucky to have one within walking distance, although it's not the one I've been considering joining. Perhaps the local club might be a better choice than a university club as it would be easier to get to training. Anyhow it's good to hear that you weren't made to run every session and instead got to use a variety of cardio exercises. I love cycling and would be happy with that option too.
 
#4
Thanks for replying Shaun! :D It's a shame there aren't any rowing clubs in your area. I'm lucky to have one within walking distance, although it's not the one I've been considering joining. Perhaps the local club might be a better choice than a university club as it would be easier to get to training. Anyhow it's good to hear that you weren't made to run every session and instead got to use a variety of cardio exercises. I love cycling and would be happy with that option too.
I know some rowing clubs have rowing machines for warm ups. I like doing exercise specific warm ups because it makes the rowing easier when you start on the water, you are already in the groove. Obviously it needs to be gentle or it will be counter-productive.
 
#5
Maybe I'm being a bit brainless but why would you use an exercise that focuses on your lower body when rowing is an upper body thing? I mean yeah, my legs do get tensed whenever I go canoeing but for the most part my arms are the ones who are doing most of the work. Wouldn't it make more sense to do some push-ups or something to warm up?
 
#6
Maybe I'm being a bit brainless but why would you use an exercise that focuses on your lower body when rowing is an upper body thing? I mean yeah, my legs do get tensed whenever I go canoeing but for the most part my arms are the ones who are doing most of the work. Wouldn't it make more sense to do some push-ups or something to warm up?
Rowing is not an upper body exercise, it is a total body exercise. Much of the power comes from your legs, the quads and hamstrings are big powerful muscles. You do have a point, though, I would rather warm up on a rowing machine than go for a long run. By using a rowing machine you will warm up all the muscles you will be using when you train, makes sense.
 
#7
It's great that you a rowing club near your house, I am not that lucky. As far as I am aware, you need to warm up quite a bit before you start a training session. Most trainers would ask you to run hard for at least 10-15 minutes or do some equivalent exercise. Cycling is a great alternative to running and I am sure most trainers would be OK with that option.
 
#8
It's great that you a rowing club near your house, I am not that lucky. As far as I am aware, you need to warm up quite a bit before you start a training session. Most trainers would ask you to run hard for at least 10-15 minutes or do some equivalent exercise. Cycling is a great alternative to running and I am sure most trainers would be OK with that option.
Most trainers will not ask you to run 'hard' to warm up for a rowing session. Running at high intensity for 15 minutes will hamper your rowing session because you will be knackered before you have even started rowing!
 
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